Sunday, June 5, 2016

It Is Well with My Soul

It Is Well with My Soul
By: Horatio G. Spafford
When peace like a river, attendeth my way, when sorrows, like sea billows roll;
Whatever my lot, Thou hast taught me to sway,
"It is well, it is well, with my soul."
It is well, with my soul, it is well, it is well, with my soul.
~~~~~
My sin, O the bliss of this glorious tho't, my sin not in part but the whole
Is nailed to the cross and I bear it no more.
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, o my soul!
It is well, with my soul, it is well, it is well, with my soul.
~~~~~
O, Lord haste the day when my faith shall be sight,
The clouds be rolled back as a scroll;
The trump shall resound and the Lord shall descend,
"Even so" it is well with my soul.
It is well, with my soul, it is well, it is well, with my soul.
~~~~~
When the great Chicago fire consumed the Windy City in 1871, Horatio G. Spafford, an attorney heavily invested in real estate, lost a fortune. About that time, his only son, age 4, succumbed to scarlet fever. Horatio drowned his grief in work, pouring himself into rebuilding the city and assisting the 100,000 who had been left homeless.
In November of 1873, he decided to take his wife and daughters to Europe. Horatio was close to D.L. Moody and Ira Sankey, and he wanted to visit their evangelistic meetings in England, then enjoy a vacation.
When an urgent matter detained Horatio in New York, he decided to send his wife, Anna, and their four daughters, Maggie, Tanetta, Annie, and Bessie, on ahead. As he saw them settled into a cabin aboard the luxurious French liner Ville du Havre, an unease filled his mind, and he moved them to a room closer to the bow of the ship. Then he said good-bye, promising to join them soon.
During the small hours of November 22, 1873, as the Ville du Havre glided over smooth seas, the passengers were jolted from their bunks. The ship had collided with an iron sailing vessel, and water poured in like Niagara. The Ville du Havre tilted dangerously. Screams, prayers, and oaths merged into a nightmare of unmeasured terror. Passengers clung to posts, tumbled through darkness, and were swept away by powerful currents of icy ocean. Loved ones fell from each other's grasp and disappeared into foaming blackness. Within two hours, the mighty ship vanished beneath the waters. The 226 fatalities included Maggie, Tanetta, Annie, and Bessie. Mrs. Spafford was found nearly unconscious, clinging to a piece of the wreckage. When the 47 survivors landed in Cardiff, Wales, she cabled her husband: "Saved Alone."
Horatio immediately booked passage to join his wife. En route, on a cold December night, the captain called him aside and said, "I believe we are now passing over the place where the Ville du Havre went down." Spafford went to his cabin but found it hard to sleep. He said to himself, "It is well; the will of God be done." He later wrote his famous hymn based on those words.
The melody for "It Is Well," titled VILLE DU HAVRE, was written by Philip Bliss who was himself soon to perish, along with his wife, in a terrible train wreck in Ohio.
Taken from "Then Sings My Soul" by Robert J. Morgan
 
Psalms 34:19
"Many are the afflictions of the righteous: but the Lord delivereth him out of them all."
Thinking on things above,
Ashley

6 comments:

  1. I never tire of hearing this wonderful story and how the song was written! :)

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  2. Oh, my, this poor, dear man! His anguish could never be told, but, he had learned the wondrous secret of what mattered most. Thank you for reminding us of this story...I never tired of hearing it, either. :)

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  3. I agree with both the comments above! This story never gets old. It Is Well is one of my favorite songs, if not my favorite. I always find it amazing and inspiring that in spite of the awful things that Mr. Spafford experienced, incomprehensible to the majority of us, God gave him the strength and ability to believe and write these amazing words.

    Thanks for sharing!
    Blessings,
    Jewels
    www.myjoyfuljourneywithjesus.blogspot.com

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    1. Dear Julia,
      Thank you so much for leaving me a comment. I love this song as well. It's so neat to read the background story of hymns...many were written by people who were going through a trial. God used them in such a mighty way to reach so many people. :)
      Love,
      Ashley

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  4. My grandma tells us this story every time we sing it together, and I don't think I could ever tire of hearing it either! Thank you for sharing!

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    1. My pleasure, Abigail. Thank you for commenting. :)
      Love,
      Ashley

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